Summary of Abstract Submission

Abstract Submission No. IO50-12-0005PresentationPoster

ABIOGENIC GAS HYDRATES: PROSPECTS IN THE NORTHERN INDIAN OCEAN

ANIL L. PAROPKARI*1, M. J. GONSALVES1, M. KOCHERLA1, S. M. KARISIDDAIAH1

1 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF OCEANOGRAPHY, DONA PAULA, GOA, INDIA

ABSTRACT :

Present day energy crunch has lead many countries, including India, to intensify exploration activities towards discovering and harnessing new hydrocarbon deposits including gas hydrates. The methods employed for exploration are based on the geophysical principles such as seismic, magnetic, gravity etc. to locate the occurrence of sedimentary rocks which are associated by different types of traps. It is believed that such sedimentary deposits, being porous in nature, house substantial quantities of oil and gas. Another basic principle of this exploration is that the sediments should contain sufficient amount of organic matter. This aspect is very crucial since it is believed that the organic matter is a precursor for generation of hydrocarbons - biogenic origin of hydrocarbons. However, of late, scientists have brought out many instances wherein the non-biogenic/abiogenic hydrocarbons are responsible for the formation of hydrocarbon pools. Relatively nascent, this abiogenic theory is gaining momentum. In this context, we would like to briefly present an example of Krishna-Godavari Basin (KGB) in the Bay of Bengal, in the northern Indian Ocean, where we believe that the ┐gas hydrate┐ deposits are formed mainly due to the abiogenic methane. Here, most of the massive gas hydrates occur as fracture-filling in high angle fractures which probably provide pathways for the migration of abiogenic methane from deep interior. It must be mentioned here that, with regard to gas hydrates, the Eastern Margin of India seems to be more promising than the Western Margin of India in the Northern Indian Ocean.